crowd sourcing and the self-sufficient digital native

Screen shot 2013-01-08 at 1.40.27 PMIT savvy is no longer the exclusive domain of the IT organization. IT plays a pivotal role in many end users day-to-day activity and is as natural as breathing in and out.  Digital natives entering the market has led to the creation of a new type of IT user, one where self-sufficiency has become a way of life. Social IT activity rarely includes a support organization ready to leap to your aid in times of trouble instead the user relies on support found from using search engines, blogs, on-line documentation and through social collaboration.  When the IT savvy digital native enters the job market their ability to deal with (or at least attempt to deal with) IT issues (e.g. connectivity, access or file sharing) is significantly greater when compared with people entering the market only a decade ago.

Working with digital natives I find them to be more self-sufficient and believe IT problems can be solved faster if they are given the ability to do it themselves.  This emerging environment ‘should’ create changes into how users are enabled and supported. For example; if the end user is more self sufficient then service management tools should provide a lot more than a hotline support number. Service management tools could be enhanced with self help, intelligent search, automated recovery and importantly, crowd sourced information. Crowd sourced information could allow users to understand how IT is being experienced by their colleagues while also helping the IT support organization understand end user experience and aid root cause analysis.  This capability is especially important with applications sourced from diverse locations and the prolific use of mobile devices.  The reality is; a service desk has no clue where you are and what you are doing so when problems occur it’s just the beginning. The only view of IT service and what’s really being experienced can be attained from the end user and increasingly, by the end user. All this information is collected, analyzed and delivered without a single communication with a datacenter.

Crowd sourced application experience data provides a far greater understanding of overall end user status easier and with far less complexity, cost and effort than any traditional datacenter centric IT management tool. Of course, it does not give the deep-dive information many APM tools provide but in this case it’s not just about application availability (e.g. downrightnow.com) it’s about helping the end user become more productive and self sufficient.

This is not something found in IT operations management today, however the concept has been used in other types of applications (e.g. waze and GPS navigation) where crowd-sourced data provides work-arounds and options. For road navigation it could advise taking an alternative route due to an accident, for IT it could be to use an alternative printer or avoid using a mobile device in an area where performance is being impacted.

What I have described is a future state so for the time-being digital natives are going to continue to find ways to support themselves – no matter if it’s for their own personal needs or those provided by their employers.

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